Pacific Exhibition

Phoebe Young, Staff Writer

There is a vast array of wonderful clubs and organizations here at Saint Martin’s, one of them being the Pacific Islanders Club. The Pacific Islanders Club is an organization that aims to bring students from the Pacific Islands together and allow them to express and embrace their true identities. They also work to educate Saint Martin’s students about the culture and traditions of the Pacific Islands, as well as to share this culture with those who may not know about it or be a part of it. Furthermore, the Pacific Islanders club functions as an affinity space and motivates and encourages club members to strive for their fullest academic potential by providing them with the resources and assistance they need to achieve academic excellence.

The Pacific Islanders Club has put on a multitude of fun events in the past, such as; the Holiday Hangout that occurred at the beginning of December in 2021 dedicated to making gingerbread houses, eating Panda express, prizes and raffles; the Halloween Spooktacular that the club put on in October 2021 including a costume contest, food eating contest, game booths, prizes and more; the Pizza and Painting event held in October of 2021 for students to paint, study, hang out with one another and eat pizza; and many other exciting and inclusive events for students of all kinds at Saint Martin’s to participate in. 

This March, the Pacific Islanders Club is going to be putting on an event called the Pacific Exhibition. The event will occur in the Norman Worthington Conference Center (NWCC) from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, March 30. At this year’s Pacific Exhibition, the theme will be Stories of the Pacific. The Belltower spoke with club President Ligi Saolotoga, who told us that this theme was chosen with the intention of introducing people to stories and information about the Pacific they may not have known about before.

Saolotoga also went on to explain to me that the event will focus predominantly on displaying a collection of some of the incredible art that comes from the various Pacific Islands.

We chose this theme to showcase the different and unique stories of each Pacific Island that people may not have knowledge of. This event also mainly focuses on the showcasing of a mixture of dances and songs that originate from the different pacific islands.

President Ligi Saolotoga

The event will also be providing amazing Pacific Islander foods that you definitely do not want to miss out on. It is going to be an exciting event full of the beautiful culture of the Pacific Islands.

If you are interested in attending and experiencing the Pacific Exhibition in March, you can purchase a ticket later on. Spots are limited, so if you are planning on attending, be sure to get your ticket as soon as possible. Ticket sales will be advertised on the Pacific Islanders Club’s social media, so stay on the lookout and do not miss out on this wonderful event! You can keep up to date on this event and any others the club puts on by following the club’s Instagram, which is under the handle: @smu_pacificislandersclub. Make sure to stay updated and pay attention to the club’s posts so that you don’t miss out on the Pacific Exhibition or any of the other fabulous club events!

Who Takes Care of Our Campus

Emmanuel O. Son, Staff Writer

Photo Credit: Danyka Nebel

Taking care of a private Benedictine university is a blessing, but not an easy task. In order to take care of Saint Martin’s University, many departments must work together to make the campus a better place. New Assistant Director of Public Safety, Daryl Henry, talks about who exactly takes care of our campus. Henry served for 20 years in the Security Forces in the Air Force, 15 years as a Security Supervisor at the Tacoma News Tribune, and two years at the University of Washington Security. 

Henry states that everybody takes care of campus and plays a role in that duty. However, Public Safety is mostly responsible for overseeing the campus and looking out for students, faculty and staff, guests, and buildings. Some of Public Safety’s main duties on campus include assisting with escorts at night, given the department runs 24 hours a day. Officers can escort students and faculty to and from their vehicles or buildings at any time of the day. Officers can also assist with transporting students or faculty members who need medical assistance to other parts of campus. Throughout the day, officers are also performing security checks by doing a number of patrols throughout the day, such as walking around buildings and looking out for anything out of the ordinary that might be happening on campus. The Communications team of the department is responsible for making student and staff IDs, as well as taking phone calls. They also serve as the SMU Visitor Center, making sure to always be welcoming towards newcomers to campus. 

Some other departments and offices that contribute to taking care of campus are facilities, grounds, and maintenance. Because of the areas where they do work, those departments also contribute to doing security checks for the campus, since they are also constantly going around campus, Henry states. Workers for grounds do work by edging, grass and field maintenance, trash pickup and campus clean up, and whatever it takes to keep the campus looking clean. Workers at facilities are mainly in charge of making sure that buildings function properly. This includes doors, sinks and restrooms, walls and ceilings, and the overall internal and externals of the buildings. 

A department of campus that Henry is thankful for is Bon Appetit. Serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner, he mentions that they do a great job in feeding members of the community. He also is thankful for Monk’s Bean being a convenient stop for a cup of coffee. Because of the early mornings and long hours he and other officers work, Bon Appetit’s breakfast serves as a quick and convenient meal, he says. 

Other departments such as the Abbey, Campus Ministry, and the Counseling and Wellness Center do a good job of checking in with the students and their well-being. They both serve as guidance to members of the community. He mentions that many college students are facing a number of difficulties and are often overwhelmed, so it’s always important to have people who can guide you through tough situations. “If you’re dealing with more than your capable of, it is always good to have someone to speak to,” he says. “The Monks are some of the nicest people that I have ever talked to.” 

Henry states that there are also some ways that students and staff can help take care of campus. One important thing to remember is compliance with either a student or full-time staff public safety officer. For example, always comply with an officer when asked to show identification and answer honestly. If there is anything out of the ordinary that is seen, one of the first steps that should be taken is to call Public Safety or the correct department in charge and not just walking past it. Always have the Public Safety phone number saved and be prepared to call it. Henry mentions that despite the patrols done by officers, Public Safety cannot always be everywhere so, “keep your eyes and ears open to unusual situations or people in the area and calling that information in.” “Instead of having ten sets of eyes out there, we’ll have hundreds of sets of eyes,” Henry describes it. 

Volunteering for the Greater Good

Shy Yamasaki, Staff Writer 

Volunteering and Service are some of the many Benedictine values at Saint Martin’s University. It is taught through some classes and through the ways of the community here on campus. That is why volunteering, leadership, and service are very important here at SMU, and highly recommended to volunteer and serve whenever it’s available. There are many different ways you can serve here on campus as well as off-campus. There are ways you can find out more information about volunteering and service on campus through ASSMU, different clubs posting their connections with volunteering opportunities, or posters through campus on ways you can volunteer and serve. Volunteering helps fill the service credits and fills up your heart in the process making you feel like you have made a difference around school or off-campus. 

Volunteering and serving on and off-campus helps make you understand why small changes can really make a difference in a community so close like Saint Martin’s or the Lacey and Olympia community. It has the amount of uplift and a beat to volunteering since it does affect others around you and seeing that changes are possible even though you start small then work up towards bigger changes. Volunteering with friends is always a good day because you can set goals for you and your friends to accomplish throughout your volunteering opportunity. If you are doing it with a club, you can always challenge them to see how many records they break with collecting canned foods or the number of times they have worked at a shelter for women and children to support what is needed for them.

Many ways you can serve here on campus is by working for the Admissions office since you are serving the students by showing them around campus and getting them comfortable with what they are seeing on campus. Another way you can serve, or volunteer is helping with clothing drives that are held on campus along with being an AHANA or Incipio Leader at the beginning of school. It makes you feel good about helping someone that you have been in the shoes of and making sure they feel comfortable with the campus and showing them the friendly faces, they will see around. Some other ways you can be volunteering are at Our Common Farms, Boys and Girls Club, and at the Thurston Food Bank. The Thurston Food Bank is always looking for volunteers to help distribute canned foods or even donations for the long winter days or for holidays where families and individuals need it the most. One volunteer opportunity that is coming up soon is through our Community Kitchen. The Community Kitchen holds volunteer opportunities every first Friday of each month. CRS does participate in helping and volunteering options at the Community Kitchen. The next volunteer opportunity for the community kitchen is on March 4th, so if you want to join in this opportunity contact Krystal Cardona for more information on how you could join and volunteer for this opportunity.

Restaurant Review: Pizzeria La Gitana

Phoebe Young, Staff Writer 

The Olympia and Lacey area is bursting at the seams with an incredible variety of different cafes and restaurants, many of which offer an array of good foods. In particular, there are many wonderful Italian restaurants throughout the area. If you like authentic Italian food in a classy, modern setting, you need to check out Pizzeria La Gitana in downtown Olympia. Pizzeria La Gitana was recommended to me by a friend who told me that it was highly underrated and not super well known. I love Italian food, so I went to try it out over the weekend with a few of my friends, and I was very pleasantly surprised. The environment there is very romantic and classy. There are lots of warm lights that illuminate the tables from the ceilings and walls, lots of vines hanging from the ceiling, paintings and miscellaneous art along the walls, and we even had a real rose in a vase on our table. They have a huge, authentic pizza oven behind the counter, and you can actually watch as your pizza is being made, which definitely adds to the experience of Italian cuisine. The building is very spacious and clean, and overall, a very aesthetic place to enjoy your meal.

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Photo from twitter @ThurstonTalk

Our waiters were very kind and helpful, and they seemed genuinely pleased to serve us, even though we arrived a little less than an hour before they closed for the night. They were patient as we decided on what to order, checked up on us often, and very willingly answered all of the questions we had about different menu items. The food was wonderful as well, although a little pricier than I had anticipated. Our meal started off with complimentary flatbread covered in sea salt and rosemary which was delicious. We ordered a side salad as well, which came with mixed greens, balsamic vinegar, mushrooms, olives, olive oil, and artichokes, which was very refreshing. I also ordered a breve, and I was very pleased with the quality and flavor of the espresso.

We ordered Carbonara over fusilli and a Fresca pizza as well, which both arrived very quickly and tasted great. The Carbonara was creamy, and the bacon was savory, although we felt the sauce itself could benefit from a little more seasoning. The portion size was not large enough for the price, but it was still filling, and we definitely did not leave any leftovers. The Fresca was delicious and had a wonderful balance of heartiness from the cheese and refreshing lightness from the tomatoes and basil. 
For our dessert, we ordered both the tiramisu and the affogato, both of which we felt were very good. The tiramisu was one of the best I have ever had and was super light and fluffy. It had a perfect balance of sweetness and lightness from the ladyfingers and mascarpone cream, and bitterness from the espresso. I had never had affogato before, but it was very good as well. The gelato was sweet and creamy and complimented the espresso very well. As with my breve and the tiramisu, the espresso was delicious, and of very good quality. Overall, Pizzeria La Gitana is definitely somewhere I would go again and recommend to others. The food is very good and worth spending a little extra money on, the workers are great, and the restaurant itself is beautiful. If you are in need of a date spot and want to check out some new restaurants in the area, or just enjoy Italian food, Pizzeria La Gitana is definitely worth checking out.

The History of Black History Month

Gilbert Smith, Staff Writer

Black History Month has not always been around, in fact, it is a relatively new thing. It all began as recently as 1915, half a century after the abolishment of slavery with the Thirteenth Amendment. In the September of 1915, Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard-trained historian, and the minister Jesse E. Moorland founded the, “Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), an organization dedicated to researching and promoting achievements by Black Americans and other peoples of African descent,” explains HISTORY. Today, the association is known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). HISTORY continues, “the group sponsored a national Negro History week in 1926”. The group had decided to choose the second week of Feb. to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. This event led to the inspiration of schools and communities nationwide to organize celebrations, form history clubs, and host performances and lectures. Since the beginning of this event, the main focus was to encourage the teaching of the history of Black Americans in educational institutions with a focus on primary education. 

Originally, the overall reception was lukewarm, but Woodson considered it a great success. In the Feb. of 1969, the idea for Black History Month was brought up and promoted by Black students and educators at Kent State University. The next year was the first celebration of Black History Month on campus and local areas. Six years later, in 1975, Black History Month was being celebrated across the country, both in and out of schools, colleges, and community centers. In 1976, President Gerald Ford was the first president to not only recognize, but praise, Black History Month. Since then, every American president has proclaimed Feb. as Black History Month. Other countries such as Canada and the United Kingdom dedicate a month to acknowledging and celebrating Black history. 

With each year comes a new theme that is given to Black History Month, this year being “Black Health and Wellness.” This year’s theme is dedicated to examining how the American Healthcare system has over-served and harmed the African American communities. The historical abandonment of the communities within the healthcare system goes back centuries and is still not fixed. Even today, the US chooses to stay behind the forward movement of the rest of the world in providing affordable medical care for its citizens. This puts African Americans and other minorities among the country’s most vulnerable communities, especially if they are poor. 

There are many people who are celebrated in Black History Month. There is Martin Luther King Jr. who is well known for his “I have a dream” speech and is celebrated for his efforts in the fight for equal rights and the end to segregation in all walks of life. There were also many firsts to celebrate with Thurgood Marshall being appointed to the court in 1967, Mae Jemison in space in 1992 and Barack Obama in the 21st century.

Black History Month Events 

There have been events on campus that talk about topics related to it that will have happened by the time this goes up like “Liberty and Justice for All? African-American History and American Democracy” on Feb. 9th in Cebula Hall. There most likely will be more events that will celebrate it on campus.

Sources

https://www.history.com/topics/black-history/black-history-month

https://nationaltoday.com/black-history-month/

http://www.chiff.com/home_life/holiday/black-history-month.htm

Athlete Spotlight: Noah Boyd

Eric Bell, Staff Writer

As the second semester is off and running, we have moved along into a new sports season! Spring seasons are gearing up and before they get completely underway, The Belltower decided to catch up with a student-athlete on the Saint Martin’s track and field team, Noah Boyd. 

Noah Boyd is a freshman on the team. Before he was a Saint, Noah attended Olympia high school where he played football, track, and was also a member of the basketball team. Way to go Noah!

Currently, Noah has found an event he is very passionate about, competing in the 400 hurdles. With being so busy, he was gracious enough to take some time to share a bit about his first year as a Saint. 

“It’s been pretty good”, said Boyd, “I’ve had decent grades as far as school goes and track has been pretty good.” Boyd then got into more about being a student-athlete here at Saint Martin’s. “Honestly, just everyone has been really friendly.” This is a common theme from students about being here. With such a small campus, everyone seems to know everyone, and the people seem to be able to develop pretty close connections here. Maybe it’s because people have a better chance of getting to know each other, but everyone is friendly and welcoming. As a lot of Saint Martin’s is comprised of student-athletes, many people here understand what each other are going through and respect the time and effort it takes to juggle school and sports. Even for people who don’t play sports here, the school does a good job at getting people involved, so much that many people do some sort of extracurricular activity.

“A lot of people on the track team have been very talkative and been really open to me,” Boyd said. It is awesome that freshmen especially feel like they have a place here, as we all know transitioning into college from high school can be very difficult. 

Teammates being communicative and open are important because they can help answer any questions new student-athletes on campus may have. These types of teammates can also help others feel comfortable just being themselves. People should feel all they need to be is themselves, and it is great if others can help them get there. This is a lesson to all of us, whether we are teammates or not, is to be able to appreciate people for who they are.

Finally, when I asked Boyd about what he is excited for in the future here, he replied with, “Competing, honestly.” That is a great answer, and an answer that resonates well with many student-athletes. I think I can speak for the majority of athletes on this one: we just want to play. It is truly a blessing to be able to play the sport we love at this level, and we are all truly grateful to be where we are today.

Boyd then goes on to say, “I’m a walk-on so I haven’t got to go to any meets yet, but I look forward to getting better and hopefully getting a scholarship soon.” That is a great mindset to have, and I am confident that his goal of getting better is what will help him going forward. I wish him all the best. Good luck Noah and enjoy your time here. 

Saint Martin’s University Track and Field/Cross Country logo

Via: Saint Martin’s XC/TF (@SMUSaints_XCTF) / Twitter

Club Interview: Pacific Islanders Club

Saint Martin’s is known to host many exciting events, organizations, and clubs. One of the clubs to get to know is the Pacific Islanders Club. The club members discuss the name of their club and the activities and events they do, “We are known as the Pacific Islanders Club or PAC-I for short. In our club, we host small events throughout the semester that consist of but are not limited to Movie Nights, Bingo Nights, Mental Health Nights, and many more. We’ve danced traditional dances, sang traditional songs, and spoke on issues occurring in the Pacific Islands during Multicultural Week, for clubs inviting us out to talk on certain topics pertaining to what’s going on in the Islands, and lastly collaborated with the KaPuso Club in the past for an event we called “Family Night” and will soon be hosting our solo event as well.” 

The club discusses the events that they participate in, “The Pacific Islanders Club is part of any and all events that we get invited to, currently we are working with the Hui O’ Hawai’i Club to perform at the Lu’au.” 

All of our campus clubs bring something unique to Saint Martin’s. The club members discuss what their club brings to Saint Martin’s “Our club brings diversity to Saint Martin’s University. We are a club that consists of members who’re from different parts of the Pacific, individuals that are representing their culture, families, and islands. Individuals who have different stories and cultures to share with the SMU Community.” The club members discuss reasons why students should join their club. “Although our club is called the “Pacific Islanders Club” or “Pac-I” for short, we’re honestly a melting pot of different ethnicities. Individuals from near and far have joined our club, people who identify as PI have joined our club, and people who don’t identify as PI have joined our club as well. We’re open and accepting to all and only wish for the best for those who’re here to make their mark and want anyone and everyone that joins to know that we care and we see how far you’ve come!” 

The PI club has an impact on all that join, and want to create a welcoming environment for those who join them, “Our club is important because it provides a safe place for those who’re far from their homes, who feel like they don’t have family out here in WA, and it’s open to anyone who enjoys hanging out and just having good vibes. We want to bring together the students of the Pacific Islands, provide a sense of “home” away from home, and educate and share our cultures and traditions. As well as being an educational space, the PI club hopes to serve as an affinity space – meaning that we push to not only create a safe environment but also encourage our club members to strive for academic excellence seeking help not only within the club and provide resources to better serve their needs. The club members add on “Shout Outs’ to those who had to leave their islands to come to the mainland to make their mark! Shout Outs to those who are the first in their family to come to college! And Shout Outs to all of those who are trying their best to make it in this huge world! We see ya’ll and wish you all the best!”

“Thank you and Fa’afetai tele lava!”

Professor Highlight: Ramon Luzarraga

Phoebe Young, Staff Writer 

Saint Martin’s has an abundance of amazing professors, one of them being Dr. Luzarraga, who teaches theology and religious studies here, and serves as the chair of the department. He loves traveling and meeting people, movies and live theater, going to baseball games, and attending SMU sporting events.  This is only Dr. Luzarraga’s second semester at Saint Martin’s, but he has been teaching for 19 years now. However, he did not always know he wanted to teach.

“I thought I would become a lawyer,” he told me. “However, Dr. Elizabeth Krauss, one of my philosophy professors at Fordham University, where I earned my undergraduate degree, invited me to take her doctoral seminar on the thought of the French philosopher Henri Bergson. Suddenly, I was with people almost twice my age and didn’t make a fool of myself. I got an A in the class. This led to other graduate courses in philosophy, which made me realize I had a strong interest in philosophy and theology. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to teach until I was given my first classes at Marquette University, where I earned my doctorate. There, I taught courses for traditional and non-traditional students. I enjoyed the work and received strong, positive feedback. That sealed what my vocation would be: a university professor.”

Dr. Luzarraga is originally from Philadelphia, where he actually had the opportunity to ring the Liberty Bell.

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I did not get explicit permission to ring that bell. But, when the park ranger handed me the rubber mallet she used to ring the bell, I made the logical deduction and rang it for myself. It may now hold a hairline crack with my name on it!

Since then, he has been a bit of a rolling stone throughout his life.

“My father’s work took me and my family to New Orleans and New York City. My studies and my work as a professor took me to New York City, New Haven, Connecticut, Milwaukee, Dayton, Ohio, Phoenix, and now here.”

Since moving here, he has fallen in love with the pacific northwest.

“I moved here last May from Phoenix to take on the position I hold here at Saint Martin’s: Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies. Having lived in the desert for eight years, I now appreciate why Jesus Christ spent no more than 40 days at a time there. I love the Puget Sound area. It reminds me of my life on the East Coast, only the mountains here are more majestic and uniquely beautiful in every season and every time of day when I can see them.”

This is part of what he loves about Saint Martin’s as well.

“The setting is very beautiful. It is the most beautiful campus I have ever worked at!”

Although the beautiful setting is not the only thing he loves about our school.

“The abbey and its community, which I consider my parish for daily Mass or prayer, is decisively important for a Catholic university like ours. It distinguishes life and study here from other universities. Any university can teach you how to make a living. A Catholic university has the freedom and ability to teach you how to develop a life worth living.”

Although this is only Dr. Luzarraga’s second semester here, he’s already made some wonderful memories, one of his favorites being the Gala. 

“One of my students, Laia Currius, nominated me to be honored by our Women’s basketball team. It was a novel experience to run between two rows of cheerleaders and coaches being rah-rahed and high-fived. I am grateful for having received that honor so early in my time here.”

He also recalls fondly, “Meeting with the Saint Martin’s leadership, my department colleagues, and the leadership of the Archdiocese of Seattle and the Diocese of Yakima, as we plan to build up this department and its programs in partnership with the Catholic Church in western and central Washington.”

When I asked Dr. Luzarraga what advice he would give to students, he passed on some advice he received in college.

“One of my professors at Fordham told me to ‘let college happen.’ It is important to plan ahead, but be open to being surprised. You may experience a class which opens up an entirely new horizon,” which he said is what happened to him. He also advised that, “If you are offered the opportunity to continue your education after Saint Martin’s, take it! And, always complete your degrees and other training, even if you are not sure how it will benefit you. We are, for better and for worse, a credential-driven society. Having credentials opens up opportunities.”

 Finally, Dr. Luzarraga left me with this:

“A University with an Abbey at its heart teaches the underappreciated skill, at least in our country at this time, of being quiet. Action is productive only if it is backed by sound theory. Discovering sound theory takes a great deal of quiet time to think, meditate, and pray about.”

Homecoming the Saint’s Way

Shy Yamasaki, Staff Writer

Homecoming is an important event at any point in your life, both during high school and in college. Whether it is your first or last, students need to have fun and celebrate spirit week. One may be asking, “why is homecoming so special?” It is the week to experience and participate in different events, leading to the pep rally and game. When experiencing homecoming week, one can have fun with their group of friends while participating in the various themes presented for each day. While some may think homecoming is overrated, it shows a united front with the school as they show school spirit. Students enjoy participating during homecoming week because it gives them time to relax and be one with everyone around them instead of always having their nose in a book. While academics continue to be necessary, participating in homecoming is when the community can come together and enjoy the smiles, laughs, and happiness around them. 

Saint Martin’s has created great campus events for us this week. Thanks to the Campus Activity Board, or “CAB” as most know it to be, this week was full of fun. It started with Marty Monday: everyone was to wear their Saints gear to class and then head down to Harned Hall from 12 pm-2 pm for a “pick me up.” It was encouraged to post pictures on Instagram and tag @smucampuslife to let everyone see that swag. On Tuesday, you are welcome to participate in  Thankful Tuesday by posting a photo with friends in coordinated outfits and another chance to tag campus life and enter a raffle for that day. 

Everything looks better in white, and Saints could join campus life for White Out Wednesday on 2/2/22. This event allowed students to show their best angel outfits. Later that day, you could join CAB in Harned Hall from 3-5 pm to manifest goals by writing down your affirmations. Everyone loves the opportunity to stay comfy in their pajamas, so on Thursday it was pajama day where you could wear your PJs during class. Eventually, the fun had to end, so we wrapped up the weekdays on Fun Friday, your chance to dress to impress with another opportunity to be entered in the raffle for the day. 

We hope that you enjoyed the events leading up to the big game. It was a fantastic opportunity to step out of your comfort zone and meet new people. Make sure to post all of the memories you made and tag our campus life. The pep rally is scheduled from 4:30-5 pm.

Crime Rates in Olympia and how to keep Yourself Safe

Ailina Cunningham, Staff Writer

Typically, Olympia is known as one of the safer places to live and work. As a close-knit community and small-town, it tends to make the news, and everyone knows about it whenever something happens. However, even in a safe community such as Olympia, it is always essential to keep your eyes and ears aware of any possible crimes that can happen to keep yourself and your friends and family safe. Some of the most important things to look out for are auto thefts and personal thefts. These are very common things to see in every community, and Olympia and Thurston County are no exception. Check out your local crime statistics in terms of which types of crime you should be watching out for the most at city-data.com. This is a website that can show you which crimes are statistically on the rise and which crimes are decreasing in occurrence frequency.

The best way to avoid common crimes like theft or car theft is always to be aware of your surroundings and constantly be taking precautionary measures to ensure your safety. These measures can include things like keeping your keys in your hands as you walk to your car or locking your doors as soon as you get into your vehicle, which does not allow anyone to get in the car with you without your knowledge. Options such as hiding your valuables in safe areas and keeping your phone on you and fully charged in case you need it to make a call. In case of a theft, it is always helpful to include lots of details as to what was stolen and where you were, and when it took place so that the police can assist you to the best of their ability. Remember to park in well-lit areas and close your windows to prevent anyone from being able to reach inside your car.

Using these basic safety tips can help prevent you from being subject to car theft or personal theft as well as ensure your safety in the future as you encounter new and exciting places. According to cityrating.com, the projected data for robbery and theft in Olympia, Washington, is 1,470 occurrences per one hundred thousand residents. This means that theft and larceny is one of the biggest issues that Olympia, Washington, faces. Taking precautionary measures to ensure your safety and the safety of those around you can be helpful to you. Additionally, as the holidays come closer, it’s always important to keep in mind that Amazon packages can quickly disappear due to porch thieves. To prevent this, it is helpful to keep watch of the packages you are anticipating and track them to understand when they arrive. When they do arrive, you can bring them into your place of residence as quickly as possible, and if you see any suspicious packages that you have not ordered, do not open them. If you are concerned, you can contact the authorities. With these helpful tips and tricks this coming holiday season, everyone should enjoy the super fun holiday experience without the problems of being victimized by theft and burglary. Only by following these helpful tricks can you keep yourself safe as well as the people you love around you.